Game: "Guess The Animals"

Animal cookies make this both a fun game and a treat for preschoolers as they learn about animals.  Adaptable for older children, who can play as a game of charades.  Enhance this curriculum with picture books

Materials: A bag of animal cookies/crackers.

Description: Teachers provide a bag of animal cookies/crackers and invite the children to take turns pulling a cookie/cracker out of the bag. Younger children can act out the noise the animal makes or movements that animal does. The other children guess what animal they have. Older children that understand charades can act out the animal any way they need to.  Children 8 and up can make it as a game of pictionary, using a board or paper.

Comments: You get to eat your animal after it has been guessed!

 


Art: Penguins
Elementary children use fine motor skill during this art activity

Materials: Have each child bring in a empty 2 liter bottle, white paint, black, orange and yellow construction paper, glue.

Description: Put white paint into the empty bottles and let children shake until the bottles are completely covered on the inside. Then let the youngsters glue on wings, eyes and a beak. You can also use some material to make a stocking hat.

 


 

Paper Tube Animals
Promotes eye-hand coordination and recognition of shapes and colors with this early childhood

Materials: Cardboard tubes, glue (sticks work best), various colors of construction paper, scissors, markers and/or crayons.

Description:  First cut triangles, squares, rectangles, circles and other shapes from different colored paper. Help maybe needed for 3-4 year olds. Next, take the tube and glue a strip of paper on it, making sure it covers the cardboard. Pick shapes to create ears, eyes and other facial features i.e. white circles for eyes and glue them to the tube and let dry.

Young children may use them like puppets to act out stories they may make up.

Comments: This project encourages the children to create their own fantasy creatures as well as ones they are familiar with. This gives their imagination a boost for later projects.


 

Lady Bug Rocks
Promotes eye-hand coordination and recognition of shapes and colors with this early childhood

Purchase or have your children help you find some flat stones outside.  Have the children paint each rock red using red tempera paint.  They can use a Q-tip to make the small black dots on the ladybugs back.  When ladybug rocks are dry, the children can glue them on a green poster board leaf cut-out.


 

Paper Towel Roll Grasshoppers
Elementary

children use fine motor skill during this art activity

Have children paint an empty paper towel roll green.  After it has dried, have them attach green pipe cleaners for its legs (punch holes along side of paper towel roll).  Staple down one end of the roll for the head and add round orange paper eyes. These look really cute on a bulletin board!

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